When the News Went Live

This 50th anniversary edition includes new photos, insights, and reflections on the state of news (and faux news) today from the four men who were active participants in television news' pivotal moment.

When the News Went Live

The minutes, hours, and days after President John F. Kennedy was shot on November 22, 1963, provided no ready answers about what was going on, what would happen next, or what any of it meant. For millions of Americans transfixed by the incomparable breaking news, television—for the first time—emerged as a way to keep informed. But the journalists who brought the story to the television airwaves could only rely on their skill, their experience, and their stamina to make sense of what was, at the time, the biggest story of their lives. President Kennedy’s assassination was the first time such big breaking news was covered spontaneously—this book tells the stories of four men who were at the epicenter of it all. Bob Huffaker, Bill Mercer, George Phenix, and Wes Wise were among those responsible for covering the assassination and its aftermath for Dallas’s KRLD. These reporters fed news and footage to Walter Cronkite and all of the other CBS affiliates around the country. From the presidential motorcade to Parkland Hospital, from Lee Harvey Oswald’s shooting to the trial and lonesome death of Jack Ruby, these men were there, on the inside. The view they were afforded of these events was unparalleled; the tales they have to tell, one-of-a-kind. This 50th anniversary edition includes new photos, insights, and reflections on the state of news (and faux news) today from the four men who were active participants in television news' pivotal moment.

More Books:

When the News Went Live
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: Bob Huffaker, Bill Mercer, George Phenix, Wes Wise
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-07 - Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing

The minutes, hours, and days after President John F. Kennedy was shot on November 22, 1963, provided no ready answers about what was going on, what would happen next, or what any of it meant. For millions of Americans transfixed by the incomparable breaking news, television—for the first time—emerged as
When the News Went Live
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Bill Mercer, Bob Huffaker, George Phenix, Wes Wise
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-09-27 - Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing

For four reporters (Huffaker, Mercer, Phenix, and Wise) at CBS affiliate KRLD-TV in Dallas on November 22, 1963, there was not a dress rehearsal for what they had to do in the aftermath of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. They provided the first continuous feed of an unfolding
Dallas 1963
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Bill Minutaglio, Steven L. Davis
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-08 - Publisher: Hachette UK

In the months and weeks before the fateful November 22nd, 1963, Dallas was brewing with political passions, a city crammed with larger-than-life characters dead-set against the Kennedy presidency. These included rabid warriors like defrocked military general Edwin A. Walker; the world's richest oil baron, H. L. Hunt; the leader of
The Poison Patriarch
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Mark Shaw
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-10-01 - Publisher: Skyhorse

Focusing for the first time on why attorney general Robert F. Kennedy wasn’t killed in 1963 instead of on why President John F. Kennedy was, Mark Shaw offers a stunning and provocative assassination theory that leads directly to the family patriarch, Joseph P. Kennedy. Mining fresh information and more than
Encyclopedia of Journalism
Language: en
Pages: 3136
Authors: Christopher H. Sterling
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-09-25 - Publisher: SAGE Publications

"Written in a clear and accessible style that would suit the needs of journalists and scholars alike, this encyclopedia is highly recommended for large news organizations and all schools of journalism." —Starred Review, Library Journal Journalism permeates our lives and shapes our thoughts in ways we've long taken for granted.