The Ghost Ship of Brooklyn

Armbruster, Eugene L. The Wallabout Prison Ships: 17761783. New York, 1920. Banks, James Lenox. David Sproat and Naval Prisoners in the War of the Revolution, with Mention of William Lenox, of Charlestown. New York: Knickerbocker Press ...

The Ghost Ship of Brooklyn

The most horrific struggle of the American Revolution occurred just 100 yards off New York, where more men died aboard a rotting prison ship than were lost to combat during the entirety of the war. Moored off the coast of Brooklyn until the end of the war, the derelict ship, the HMS Jersey, was a living hell for thousands of Americans either captured by the British or accused of disloyalty. Crammed below deck -- a shocking one thousand at a time -- without light or fresh air, the prisoners were scarcely fed food and water. Disease ran rampant and human waste fouled the air as prisoners suffered mightily at the hands of brutal British and Hessian guards. Throughout the colonies, the mere mention of the ship sparked fear and loathing of British troops. It also sparked a backlash of outrage as newspapers everywhere described the horrors onboard the ghostly ship. This shocking event, much like the better-known Boston Massacre before it, ended up rallying public support for the war. Revealing for the first time hundreds of accounts culled from old newspapers, diaries, and military reports, award-winning historian Robert P. Watson follows the lives and ordeals of the ship's few survivors to tell the astonishing story of the cursed ship that killed thousands of Americans and yet helped secure victory in the fight for independence.

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The Wallabout Prison-ships, 1776-1783
Language: en
Pages: 29
Authors: Eugene L. Armbruster
Categories: United States
Type: BOOK - Published: 1920 - Publisher:

Books about The Wallabout Prison-ships, 1776-1783
The Ghost Ship of Brooklyn
Language: en
Pages: 312
Authors: Robert P. Watson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-08-15 - Publisher: Hachette UK

The most horrific struggle of the American Revolution occurred just 100 yards off New York, where more men died aboard a rotting prison ship than were lost to combat during the entirety of the war. Moored off the coast of Brooklyn until the end of the war, the derelict ship,
Liberty on the Waterfront
Language: en
Pages: 344
Authors: Paul A. Gilje
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

"In its ambitious sweep and encyclopedic detail, Gilje's rendering of American maritime culture during the tumultuous century from 1750 to 1850 is unlikely to be surpassed."--"William and Mary Quarterly"
Keepers of the Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 312
Authors: Paul Gilje, Howard B. Rock
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-08-06 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

They recreate the rhythms of daily life, clarify the impact of political and social changes on working people, and help us appreciate how these women and men-not just the country's founding fathers—were truly "keepers of the revolution." Paul A. Gilje and Howard B. Rock provide a general introduction to New
Captives of Liberty
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: T. Cole Jones
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-10-18 - Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

Contrary to popular belief, the American Revolutionary War was not a limited and restrained struggle for political self-determination. From the onset of hostilities, British authorities viewed their American foes as traitors to be punished, and British abuse of American prisoners, both tacitly condoned and at times officially sanctioned, proliferated. Meanwhile,