The Right Way to Lose a War

Tough problems—and they don't come much tougher than ending a failing war—rarely have easy solutions. But there are general rules, or a widely applicable framework for handling loss. Military fiascos don't repeat themselves, ...

The Right Way to Lose a War

Why has America stopped winning wars? For nearly a century, up until the end of World War II in 1945, America enjoyed a Golden Age of decisive military triumphs. And then suddenly, we stopped winning wars. The decades since have been a Dark Age of failures and stalemates-in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan-exposing our inability to change course after battlefield setbacks. In this provocative book, award-winning scholar Dominic Tierney reveals how the United States has struggled to adapt to the new era of intractable guerrilla conflicts. As a result, most major American wars have turned into military fiascos. And when battlefield disaster strikes, Washington is unable to disengage from the quagmire, with grave consequences for thousands of U.S. troops and our allies. But there is a better way. Drawing on interviews with dozens of top generals and policymakers, Tierney shows how we can use three key steps-surge, talk, and leave-to stem the tide of losses and withdraw from unsuccessful campaigns without compromising our core values and interests. Weaving together compelling stories of military catastrophe and heroism, this is an unprecedented, timely, and essential guidebook for our new era of unwinnable conflicts. The Right Way to Lose a War illuminates not only how Washington can handle the toughest crisis of all-battlefield failure-but also how America can once again return to the path of victory.

More Books:

The Right Way to Lose a War
Language: en
Pages: 400
Authors: Dominic Tierney
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-06-02 - Publisher: Hachette UK

Why has America stopped winning wars? For nearly a century, up until the end of World War II in 1945, America enjoyed a Golden Age of decisive military triumphs. And then suddenly, we stopped winning wars. The decades since have been a Dark Age of failures and stalemates-in Korea, Vietnam,
Victory
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: Cian O'Driscoll
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-29 - Publisher:

Committing one's country to war is a grave decision. Governments often have to make tough calls, but none are quite so painful as those that involve sending soldiers into harm's way, to kill and be killed. The idea of 'just war' informs how we approach and reflect on these decisions.
Japanese Girl at the Siege of Changchun
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Homare Endo
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-09-19 - Publisher: Stone Bridge Press

150,000 innocents died in Changchun at the end of WW2 when Mao's Revolutionary Army laid siege. Japanese girl Homare Endo, then age 7, was traumatized but survived to devote her life to telling the world of the atrocity China now denies. This gripping, firsthand account is tough reading, full of
Moral Victories
Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Andrew R. Hom, Cian O'Driscoll, Kurt Mills
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-11-10 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

What does it mean to win a moral victory? Ideals of just and decisive triumphs often colour the call to war, yet victory is an increasingly dubious proposition in modern conflict, where negotiated settlements and festering violence have replaced formal surrenders. In the Just War and strategic studies traditions, assumptions
American War Stories
Language: en
Pages: 206
Authors: Brenda M. Boyle
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-13 - Publisher: Rutgers University Press

American War Stories asks readers to contemplate what traditionally constitutes a “war story” and how that constitution obscures the normalization of militarism in American culture. The book claims the traditionally narrow scope of “war story,” as by a combatant about his wartime experience, compartmentalizes war, casting armed violence as distinct