Problems of the Actor

I believe any actor could adopt this method to advantage. A qualification, however, should perhaps be added. There are times when the listener knows just what the end of the speech is to be, and the audience is waiting for the reply ...

Problems of the Actor

I HAVE been on the stage for more than forty years. My profession and its problems have been the principal interest in my life. It is natural that such an extended association with the theater should yield certain technical theories on my art; and, since I am nearing sixty, it is natural that I should want to talk about them. I do not regard any opinion I hold on the subject of acting as infallible; I learn something new about my profession every day; but there is one claim I make for the opinions I state in this book: they are not hasty. They have been two score years in taking shape. I have watched many young people start their careers on the stage; I have seen some of them rise to success, and others sink to oblivion. It has seemed to me that the difficulties each met, and the mistakes each was likely to make were, in a general way, always of the same character. They were the difficulties and mistakes which all actors encounter. There is no lack of books dealing with the lives of those in the actor’s profession. But few of them shed any light on the technique by which the admired actors of the past rose to high place. They are mostly pleasant, chatty reminiscences of their personal lives, whereas it is their professional lives that are significant. However, in this little study, I have not attempted an autobiographical account of my early struggles in the profession, nor a story of my experiences on the stage; I have rather tried to derive from my experiences some truths which might be of service to the beginning actor, to state as concretely as possible some of the simple principles which bitter experience has made me believe are sound.—Louis Calvert

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Problems of the Actor
Language: en
Pages: 133
Authors: Louis Calvert
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-12-12 - Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

I HAVE been on the stage for more than forty years. My profession and its problems have been the principal interest in my life. It is natural that such an extended association with the theater should yield certain technical theories on my art; and, since I am nearing sixty, it
The Problem of the Actress in Modern German Theater and Thought
Language: en
Pages: 246
Authors: Sara E. Jackson
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021 - Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

Around 1900, German and Austrian actresses had allure and status, apparent autonomy, and unconventional lifestyles. They presented a complex problem socially and aesthetically, one tied to the so-called Woman Question and to the contested status of modernity. For modernists, the actress's socioeconomic mobility and defiance of gender norms opened space
The Alexander Technique For Actors
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Kelly McEvenue
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-01-14 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

This practical book with illustrations links Alexander technique to acting, dancing and singing by the trainer of performers on The Lion King The Alexander Technique is a method of physical relaxation that reduces tension and strain throughout the body. It promotes a beneficial use of movement that is stress-free by
The Actor's Instrument
Language: en
Pages: 218
Authors: Hollis Huston
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher: University of Michigan Press

Theory of theater from an actor's vantage point that seeks to bridge the gap between performance and thought
The Theory of the Modern Stage
Language: en
Pages: 512
Authors: Eric Bentley
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-01-31 - Publisher: Penguin UK

In The Theory of the Modern Stage, leading drama critic, Eric Bentley, brings together landmark writings by dramatists, directors and thinkers who have had a profound effect on the theatre since the mid nineteenth century, from Adolphe Appia to Émile Zola. Here, Antonin Artaud sets out a manifesto for a