The Latin Passion Play

2 F. Neri expressed the same view when he wrote that our twelfth - century play is the earliest Passion known , " for the two monastic texts , which had been thought the earliest until now , and which come from the monastery of ...

The Latin Passion Play

In this first comprehensive study of the Latin Passion play, Professor Sticca examines the medieval liturgical ceremonies commemorating the events in Christ's Passion and traces their gradual change in character from the contemplative to the dramatic. The author shows that while Christ's Passion became increasingly popular as one of the sacred mysteries beginning in the tenth century, new forces that allowed a more eloquent and humane visualization and description of Christ's anguish first appeared in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Professor Sticca analyzes the earliest extant Latin Passion play, the twelfth-century Montecassino codex, and compares it with other Latin and vernacular Passion plays. He refutes the traditional view that the Planctus Mariae is the germinal point of the Latin Passion play and then offers a new theory of its inception. As a literary form, the Latin Passion play appears to Professor Sticca as a creation of the Montecassino monastic circle which was inspired by the liturgical services of Good Friday and the Gospel accounts. Particularly influential also were three themes that developed in the eleventh century: in liturgy, a concentration on Christocentric piety; in art, a more humanistic treatment of Christ; and in literature, a consideration of the scenes of the Passion as dramatic and human episodes. In the course of this investigation, Professor Sticca also reappraises traditional views of the origin of the medieval liturgical drama, indicating that it should not be traced exclusively to the tropes from the schools of St. Gall and St. Martial of Limoges, but rather to a number of sources.

More Books:

The Latin Passion Play
Language: en
Pages: 220
Authors: Sandro Sticca
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 1970-01-01 - Publisher: SUNY Press

In this first comprehensive study of the Latin Passion play, Professor Sticca examines the medieval liturgical ceremonies commemorating the events in Christ's Passion and traces their gradual change in character from the contemplative to the dramatic. The author shows that while Christ's Passion became increasingly popular as one of the
The Alsfeld Passion Play
Language: en
Pages: 648
Authors: Larry E. West
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997 - Publisher: Edwin Mellen Press

This translation and introduction is intended to fill a crucial void in German literary and linguistic scholarship by 1) making the play available to an English-speaking audience; 2) examining its origins, development, staging, and unique contributions to the genre; and 3) providing a companion text for students of late Middle
The Oberammergau Passion Play
Language: en
Pages: 204
Authors: Kevin J. Wetmore, Jr.
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-02-01 - Publisher: McFarland

Every ten years since 1634, the Bavarian village of Oberammergau has performed the world's most famous Passion Play, recounting the last days of Jesus Christ. In 2010, presenting the play for the 41st time, the village broke with tradition to offer a new interpretation for a post-millennial, international audience. Drawing
Passion Play (TCG Edition)
Language: en
Pages: 128
Authors: Sarah Ruhl
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-09-21 - Publisher: Theatre Communications Group

Named one of the "Ten Best Plays of 2008" by The New Yorker “Sarah Ruhl’s bold, inventive, and ironic triptych [is] a meditation on devotion and its appropriation by the state. . . . Ruhl is an original; a storyteller with a fine mind evolving her own theatrical idiom.”—John Lahr,
The Black Hills Passion Play
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: Johanna Meier
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

In 1932, Josef Meier, a native of Luenen, Germany, brought a small company of actors to the United States to tour with a passion play. It was performed in German, destined for a limited engagement in German theaters, churches, and German-speaking communities. Political and economic conditions in Germany were already