Imagining America at War

They are not ignored in Imagining America at War. ... Whether depicting the white, heterosexual nuclear family that is America's legacy and foundation from WWII in Pearl Harbor, the decline of the patriarchal family in We Were Soldiers, ...

Imagining America at War

Ten films released between 9/11 and Gulf War II reflect raging debates about US foreign policy and what it means to be an American. Tracing the portrayal of America in the films Pearl Harbor (World War II); We Were Soldiers and The Quiet American (the Vietnam War); Behind Enemy Lines, Black Hawk Down and Kandahar (episodes of humanitarian intervention); Collateral Damage and In the Bedroom (vengeance in response to loss); Minority Report (futurist pre-emptive justice); and Fahrenheit 9/11 (an explicit critique of Bush’s entire war on terror), Cynthia Weber presents a stimulating new study of how Americans construct their identity and the moral values that inform their foreign policy. This is not just another book about post-9/11 America. It introduces the concept of 'moral grammars of war', and explains how they are articulated: Many Americans asked in the wake of 9/11 – not only 'why do they hate us?' but 'what does it mean to be a moral America(n) and how might such an America(n) act morally in contemporary international politics? This text explores how these questions were answered at the intersections of official US foreign policy and post-9/11 popular films. It also details US foreign policy formation in relation to traditional US narratives about US identity ‘who we think we were/are’, 'who we wish we’d never been', 'who we really are', and 'who we might become' as well as in relation to their foundations in nationalist discourses of gender and sexuality. This book will be of great interest to students of American Studies, US Foreign Policy, Contemporary US History, Cultural Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Film Studies.

More Books:

Imagining America at War
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: Cynthia Weber
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-07-24 - Publisher: Routledge

Ten films released between 9/11 and Gulf War II reflect raging debates about US foreign policy and what it means to be an American. Tracing the portrayal of America in the films Pearl Harbor (World War II); We Were Soldiers and The Quiet American (the Vietnam War); Behind Enemy Lines,
Imagining America
Language: en
Pages: 404
Authors: Wesley Brown, Amy Ling
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003-02-01 - Publisher: Turtleback

Presents stories written by authors of diverse cultural backgrounds, including Alice Walker, Oscar Hijuelos, Sherman Alexie, Michelle Cliff, Mei Mei Evans, LeRoi Jones, and Sui Sin Far.
Imagining America
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Alan M. Ball
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004-09-09 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

In Imagining America, historian Alan M. Ball explores American influence in two newborn Russian states: the young Soviet Union and the modern Russian Republic. Ball deftly illustrates how in each era Russians have approached the United States with a conflicting mix of ideas—as a land to admire from afar, to
Representing and Imagining America
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Davies Philip John Davies
Categories: SOCIAL SCIENCE
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-06-01 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

In America, perhaps more than in any other western society, reality, legend and myth overlap. Americans have always been proprietorial about their country and its presentation. The international authors of this book open a range of windows on our study of the USA. Covering issues of culture and society, literature,
Objectifying China, Imagining America
Language: en
Pages: 257
Authors: Caroline Frank
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

With the ever-expanding presence of China in the global economy, Americans more and more look east for goods and trade. But as Caroline Frank reveals, this is not a new development. China loomed as large in the minds—and account books—of eighteenth-century Americans as it does today. Long before they had