Egyptian Cinema and the 2011 Revolution

This thesis examines the relationship between the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and Egyptian cinema, by focusing on the period from 2006 to the present.

Egyptian Cinema and the 2011 Revolution

This thesis examines the relationship between the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and Egyptian cinema,by focusing on the period from 2006 to the present. During this period, Egyptian films and the film industry have demonstrated a complex, yet reciprocal relationship with the revolution. The impact of the uprising on the industry and films and the engagement of films with politics revealed continuities and discontinuities in the relationship between cinema and the revolution. The thesis engages with scholarship on cinema and revolution in other national contexts such as Latin America, Iran, China and the Soviet Union. These studies reveal the use of film as a form of political expression and documentation of historical moments.Film movements have employed ‘revolutionary’ film techniques and constructed new cultures during postrevolution periods. I also examine Egyptian film literature to explain the continuity of political practices during the 2011 Revolution period. Films continue to engage with socio-political issues and Censorship of Artistic Works continues to curb films that criticise current regimes. The thesis situates itself in studies on film, media and revolution, particularly in relation to the so-called ‘Arab Spring’. It is a historical study of Egyptian filmmaking during the 2011 Revolution.The thesis draws on interviews with key Egyptian filmmakers that I conducted in Cairo from December 2014 to January 2016. The interviews explore the political economy of Egyptian cinema,including the production, distribution and exhibition of films, and issues of state censorship and regulation during the revolution. I also use archival research into speeches, state announcements, policies and legislation and press discourse. Since the 2011 Revolution, the Egyptian film industry has been facing a serious crisis due to reasons such as security and film piracy. In contrast to the support for cinemas by post-revolution governments, the Egyptian state has intervened inconsistently in issues regarding the film industry.I explore film content through textual analysis of the themes, ideologies and discourses in pre- and post-revolution films. Popular drama, political satire and independent productions contributed to the growing political activism during Mubarak’s fifth presidential term (starting in 2005). These films depicted themes of dictatorship, poverty, corruption and police brutality during the pre-revolution period and anticipated an upcoming revolution through images of dissent. Fiction and documentary films that subsequently represented the uprising historicised events and processed the collectively experienced struggle. These films contribute to the cultural memory of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, which the counterrevolution aims to suppress. The conjunction of technological developments and the revolution expanded the wave of āl-āflām āl-mustaqilla (Independent Films), which started in 2005. These films disregard the commercial considerations of film production and use new actors, digital cameras and reallocations. While film continues to contribute to political activism before revolutions and documents the revolutionary moment, the crisis of the film industry and the lack of a ‘revolutionary’ film movement characterise Egyptian cinema during the post-revolution period.

More Books:

Egyptian Cinema and the 2011 Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 208
Authors: Ahmed Ghazal
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-26 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Egypt's film industry is the largest in the Middle East, with an output that spreads across the region and the world. In the run-up to and throughout the 2011 Revolution, a complex relationship formed between the industry and the people's uprising. Both a form of political expression and a documentation
Egyptian Cinema and the 2011 Revolution
Language: en
Pages: 346
Authors: Ahmed Ghazal
Categories: Arab Spring, 2010-
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018 - Publisher:

This thesis examines the relationship between the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and Egyptian cinema,by focusing on the period from 2006 to the present. During this period, Egyptian films and the film industry have demonstrated a complex, yet reciprocal relationship with the revolution. The impact of the uprising on the industry and
Film and Counterculture in the 2011 Egyptian Uprising
Language: en
Pages: 318
Authors: Amir Taha
Categories: Arab Spring, 2010-
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021 - Publisher: Springer Nature

This book examines how film articulates countercultural flows in the context of the Egyptian Revolution. The book interrogates the gap between radical politics and radical aesthetics by analyzing counterculture as a form, drawing upon Egyptian films produced between 2010 and 2016. The work offers a definition of counterculture which liberates
Film and Counterculture in the 2011 Egyptian Uprising
Language: en
Pages: 318
Authors: Amir Taha
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-04-30 - Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

This book examines how film articulates countercultural flows in the context of the Egyptian Revolution. The book interrogates the gap between radical politics and radical aesthetics by analyzing counterculture as a form, drawing upon Egyptian films produced between 2010 and 2016. The work offers a definition of counterculture which liberates
The Egyptian Military in Popular Culture
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: Dalia Said Mostafa
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-11-23 - Publisher: Springer

This book examines a key question through the lens of popular culture: Why did the Egyptian people opt to elect in June 2014 a new president (Abdel Fattah al-Sisi), who hails from the military establishment, after toppling a previous military dictator (Hosni Mubarak) with the breakout of the 25 January