Down These Mean Streets a Man Must Go

Tells how Raymond Chandler developed the figure of the hard-boiled detective Philip Marlowe from the material and concerns of his own life.

Down These Mean Streets a Man Must Go

Tells how Raymond Chandler developed the figure of the hard-boiled detective Philip Marlowe from the material and concerns of his own life.

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Down These Mean Streets a Man Must Go
Language: en
Pages: 173
Authors: Philip Durham
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: 1963 - Publisher: Chapel Hill, U. of North Carolina P

Tells how Raymond Chandler developed the figure of the hard-boiled detective Philip Marlowe from the material and concerns of his own life.
Literaturimport transatlantisch
Language: de
Pages: 287
Authors: Uwe Baumann
Categories: American literature
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997 - Publisher: Gunter Narr Verlag

Books about Literaturimport transatlantisch
Down These Mean Streets
Language: en
Pages: 270
Authors: Keith R. A. DeCandido
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-08-30 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

As Triple X, a brand-new designer drug with devastating side effects, sweeps through the streets of New York, high school science teacher Peter Parker--and his alter ego Spider-Man--begins to suspect the drug may have originated with one of his most diabolical enemies, intent on destroying the arachnid superhero for all
Men Alone
Language: en
Pages: 384
Authors: Jopi Nyman
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-02-28 - Publisher: BRILL

This study examines masculinity and individualism in four American novels of the 1920s and 1930s usually regarded as belonging to the genre of hard-boiled fiction. The novels under study are Red Harvest by Dashiell Hammett, The Postman Always Rings Twice by James M. Cain, They Shoot Horses, Don't They? by
Mystery, Violence, and Popular Culture
Language: en
Pages: 410
Authors: John G. Cawelti
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher: Popular Press

Mystery, Violence, and Popular Culture is John G. Cawelti’s discussion of American popular culture and violence, from its precursors in Homer and Shakespeare to the Lone Ranger and Superman. Cawelti deciphers the overt sexuality, detached violence, and political intrigue embedded within Batman and .007. He analyzes the work of such