Britain in the First Age of Party 1687 1750

This collection of original essays provides a coherent account of Britain in the 'First Age of Party'.

Britain in the First Age of Party  1687 1750

The 70 years of late Stuart and early Hanoverian Britain following 1680 were a crucial period in British politics and society, seeing the growth both of political parties and of stability. This collection of original essays provides a coherent account of Britain in the 'First Age of Party'.

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Britain in the First Age of Party, 1687-1750
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Clyve Jones
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1986-07-01 - Publisher: A&C Black

The 70 years of late Stuart and early Hanoverian Britain following 1680 were a crucial period in British politics and society, seeing the growth both of political parties and of stability. This collection of original essays provides a coherent account of Britain in the 'First Age of Party'.
Whitaker's Books in Print
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Clyve Jones
Categories: Bibliography, National
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998 - Publisher:

Books about Whitaker's Books in Print
Armies and Political Change in Britain, 1660-1750
Language: en
Pages: 448
Authors: Hannah Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-01 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Armies and Political Change in Britain, 1660 -1750 argues that armies had a profound impact on the major political events of late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century Britain. Beginning with the controversial creation of a permanent army to protect the restored Stuart monarchy, this original and important study examines how armies
International Bibliography of Historical Sciences
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Hannah Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1987 - Publisher:

Verzeichnis der exzerpierton zeitschriften: 1926, p. [XXXI]-/XVII.
Making the Empire Work
Language: en
Pages: 261
Authors: Alison Gilbert Olson, Olson
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

Annotation Olson (history, U. of Maryland) argues that, until the eve of the revolution, the British crown could rule its American colonies peacefully with so few administrators because an extensive network of voluntary interest groups, tying the colonies and London, allowed colonists a measure of influence over the central government.